My Favorite Place is a Book...


I can find my own personal Wonderland in the world around me, and I enjoy writing tidbits of that mystical reality. Life is good. Life is great. What more would one need?

Ask me anything

flashbulbsburst:

featheronaflume luckyjackson

Source: venula

death-by-lulz:

keepdrinkingpoison:

Greatest pick up of all time

Source: fuckyeahmovieclub

jtotheizzoe:

via explore-blog:

The very first photo of the moon, taken by John William Draper in 1839.
Draper immigrated to the United States from England and became a chemistry professor at NYU. This daguerreotype print was the first of a series of silver platinum plates he shot using a telescope. Draper was also the first person to shoot a portrait in America, a photograph of his sister Dorothy-Catherine . In 1864, he became chairman of the American Photographic Association.
Pair with Ordering the Heavens, a visual history of humanity’s quest to depict the cosmos before telescopes.

Curious how it was done before we had fancy space telescopes? I recommend this slideshow from National Geographic: Milestones in Space Photography, featuring the first shot of the sun, taken by Louis Fizeau and Leon Foucault in 1845:

jtotheizzoe:

via explore-blog:

The very first photo of the moon, taken by John William Draper in 1839.

Draper immigrated to the United States from England and became a chemistry professor at NYU. This daguerreotype print was the first of a series of silver platinum plates he shot using a telescope. Draper was also the first person to shoot a portrait in America, a photograph of his sister Dorothy-Catherine . In 1864, he became chairman of the American Photographic Association.

Pair with Ordering the Heavens, a visual history of humanity’s quest to depict the cosmos before telescopes.

Curious how it was done before we had fancy space telescopes? I recommend this slideshow from National Geographic: Milestones in Space Photography, featuring the first shot of the sun, taken by Louis Fizeau and Leon Foucault in 1845:

Source:

”            If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonesense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?      ”
                                             —- Through the Looking Glass, Lewis Carroll.

Source: shesabsolutelyalice

brentonlittle:

And now for something completely different: “FALL / WINTER” (same tree, different season edition) This is my first diptic in at least a year. I most definitely hesitated posting this in fear of defiling my purist feed. #seasons #fall #winter

brentonlittle:

And now for something completely different: “FALL / WINTER” (same tree, different season edition) This is my first diptic in at least a year. I most definitely hesitated posting this in fear of defiling my purist feed. #seasons #fall #winter

Source: brentonlittle

Source: nemphtis

artforadults:

Fernando Issamo

Source: calitoti

I got lost in the night, without the light
of your eyelids, and when the night surrounded me
I was born again: I was the owner of my own darkness.
— Pablo Neruda, from Sonnet LVII of 100 Love Sonnets
(Translated by Stephen Tapscott)
For decades now in America we have been witnessing a steady and sickening denigration of humanistic understanding and humanistic method. We live in a society inebriated by technology, and happily, even giddily governed by the values of utility, speed, efficiency, and convenience. The technological mentality that has become the American worldview instructs us to prefer practical questions to questions of meaning – to ask of things not if they are true or false, or good or evil, but how they work.
— In his Brandeis commencement speech, Leon Wieseltier argues that we need the humanities more than ever.  (via millionsmillions)